Dan's Tech Tumblr

I am an IT professional working with non-profits, foundations and trade associations. On this blog I share links and my own insight.

April 6, 2014 at 1:01pm
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Tatsuo Horiuchi, the 73-year old Excel spreadsheet artist  →

“I never used Excel at work but I saw other people making pretty graphs and thought, ‘I could probably draw with that.”

April 5, 2014 at 1:01pm
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Try some fancy keyboard shortcuts. Other than the basics like Ctrl+C (Copy), Ctrl+X (Cut) and Ctrl+V (Pastes) — a couple of my favorites include:

Alt+Enter: When editing a cell, this create a line break in your cell.

Alt+Equals: When at the bottom of a long range of numbers, pressing this sums the numbers in the range above the selected cell.

— Microsoft Excel team answers questions and share tips on reddit

March 28, 2014 at 11:33pm
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Networking with Virtual Cisco Routers on vSphere →

March 27, 2014 at 1:01pm
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"don’t use your real name. instead, use your real name"

"don’t use your real name. instead, use your real name"

March 20, 2014 at 1:01pm
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User Account Control – What Penetration Testers Should Know →

Interesting article on bypassing UAC

March 17, 2014 at 1:01pm
184 notes
Reblogged from susiesnapshot
I bought an Etch-a-Sketch for my 2-year-old last week and he said “this ipad needs new batteries” :-/

I bought an Etch-a-Sketch for my 2-year-old last week and he said “this ipad needs new batteries” :-/

February 27, 2014 at 2:42pm
1,823 notes
Reblogged from martymcflyinthefuture
martymcflyinthefuture:

Today is the day that Marty McFly goes to the future!

martymcflyinthefuture:

Today is the day that Marty McFly goes to the future!

February 18, 2014 at 1:01pm
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45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’

45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’

(Source: writerswrite.co.za)

February 17, 2014 at 2:32pm
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Why is the mouse cursor slightly tilted and not straight?

The mouse, and therefore the mouse cursor, was invented by Douglas Englebart, and was initially an arrow pointing up.

When the XEROX PARC machine was built, the cursor changed into a tilted arrow. It was found that, given the low resolution of the screens in those days, drawing a straight line and a line in the 45 degrees angle was easier to do and more recognizable than the straight cursor.

And:

The reason the arrow was tilted to the left was so that the click position was easier to calculate, because the origin of the cursor’s bitmap was in the upper left. This saved the mouse tracking subroutine a calculation on every click (its not much but it helped on older machines).

February 12, 2014 at 1:01pm
3,880 notes
Reblogged from neuromorphogenesis
neuromorphogenesis:

Human brain reacts to emoticons as real faces
Humans have developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:

Emoticons such as :-) have become so important to how we communicate online that they are changing the way that our brains work.


They are used to provide clues to the tone of SMS, emails and tweets that can be hard to succinctly describe in words alone. But Dr Owen Churches, from the school of psychology at Flinders University in Adelaide, has found that they have become so important that we now react to them in the same way as we would to a real human face.


When we see a face there is a very specific reaction in certain parts of the brain such as the occipitotemporal cortex. When that image of a face is inverted there is another very specific reaction. This can be tracked using advanced brain scanning techniques.


Churches found that the same reaction occurred when 20 participants in a study were shown emoticons, but only when they were viewed in the traditional, left-to-right format. When they were “inverted”, or flipped to be read right-to-left, the expected reaction was not found.


This showed that humans have now developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:. The study, published in the Social Neuroscience journal, also included participants being shown real faces and meaningless strings of characters as controls.

neuromorphogenesis:

Human brain reacts to emoticons as real faces

Humans have developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:

Emoticons such as :-) have become so important to how we communicate online that they are changing the way that our brains work.

They are used to provide clues to the tone of SMS, emails and tweets that can be hard to succinctly describe in words alone. But Dr Owen Churches, from the school of psychology at Flinders University in Adelaide, has found that they have become so important that we now react to them in the same way as we would to a real human face.

When we see a face there is a very specific reaction in certain parts of the brain such as the occipitotemporal cortex. When that image of a face is inverted there is another very specific reaction. This can be tracked using advanced brain scanning techniques.

Churches found that the same reaction occurred when 20 participants in a study were shown emoticons, but only when they were viewed in the traditional, left-to-right format. When they were “inverted”, or flipped to be read right-to-left, the expected reaction was not found.

This showed that humans have now developed to read :-) in the same way as a human face, but do not have the same connection with (-:. The study, published in the Social Neuroscience journal, also included participants being shown real faces and meaningless strings of characters as controls.

February 10, 2014 at 10:29pm
40 notes
Reblogged from wordbitly

10 Things We Forgot to Monitor →

wordbitly:

There is always a set of standard metrics that are universally monitored (Disk Usage, Memory Usage, Load, Pings, etc). Beyond that, there are a lot of lessons that we’ve learned from operating our production systems that have helped shape the breadth of monitoring that we perform at bitly.

Great list!

February 9, 2014 at 1:37pm
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Best practices for secure “forgot your password” forms

Best practices for secure “forgot your password” forms

(Source: fishnetsecurity.com)

January 25, 2014 at 1:01pm
255 notes
Reblogged from spiritofapollo
spiritofapollo:

Glenn Research Center, 1989

spiritofapollo:

Glenn Research Center, 1989

January 18, 2014 at 10:01pm
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What The Fuck Is My Information Security Strategy? →

Hilarious

January 14, 2014 at 2:15pm
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Washington Metro awards Accenture major contract for new electronic fare payment system to improve customer experience →